Wheat Free Diet? 5 Foods That Can Cause Similiar Problems To Wheat

Green Med Info discusses other foods that may have properties similar to wheat.  This makes interesting reading for those who have grave health problems but see insufficient improvement in health just by following a wheat free diet. The similarities begin as they contain “chitin binding lectins” which are similar to wheat lectin (WGA).  These foods are widely consumed in the Western diet. Functionally, wheat lectin and chitin-binding lectin are identical.  Chitins are long polymers of n-acetyl-glucosamine, the primary binding target of wheat lectin.  Chitin-binding lectin containing foods include: Potato Tomato Barley Rye Rice If you suffer with coeliac disease (celiac) or wheat/gluten intolerance, then you may find further relief from gastointestinal problems if you avoid these five foods.  In my view, anyone with various gastro problems may find relief from cutting out these foods temporarily, then reintroducing them to determine if there is a sensitivity involved.  Three of my wheat sensitive clients suffer with heartburn and all report that tomatoes aggravate it. One may consider eliminating other plants from the nightshade family in addition to the tomato and potato if an improvement is seen, with a reintroduction perhaps after 2 weeks to see if there is a reaction.  This technique works for me and is how I found my wheat intolerance. In addition to this information, it is not just the grains that have an ill effect when either used whole or ground as in flour based products. Regarding the much touted healthfulness of sprouted grains such as wheat, maize and rye, they may not be as good for you as you think!  Sprouted grains also contain benzoxazinoids (BAs)—a surprisingly toxic component of the plant’s defense mechanism against pests.  A wheat free diet is not a bad idea, but incorporating the reduction of these 5 foods and possibly avoiding sprouted grains may boost the effects for improved health and...

Gluten Free Foods

Gluten Free Foods Nutritionist Mary Hondros walks you through the food aisles and shows you some gluten free foods and ingredients.  These can definitely be workable alternatives that can help you keep healthy if you suffer  from gluten intolerance or at its worst: celiac (coeliac) disease.  If you have been recently diagnosed or even suspect that gluten is a problem, then you may be panicking slightly as you think “now what CAN I eat!” This can happen with those of us who rely on grain based foods, but it’s understandable when you consider that a great proportion of easy and fast, filling foods can be gluten based such as the breads and pastas of the world.  It’s also a problem since gluten is widely used in foods that aren’t obviously made from grain; such as sausages, from the breadcrumbs that are often used as fillers. But going back to the food aisles; the main gluten culprits are wheat, wholewheat, barley, rye and malt and you will find these ingredients in foods mainly found in the bread, pasta and cereal departments. Good alternatives to these are: Buckwheat flour Rice flour Cornflour Cornmeal Tapioca flour Potato flour But you are generally safe if you find a package stating “gluten free” on the label and canned or frozen fruits, vegetables are safe. Other tips Mary suggests are to learn the other names that gluten goes by: mainly “malt”. You will find gluten free foods in specialty stores and these generally do have a good selection.  Or you could try making your own breads with substitute flours and xanthan gum, there are numerous gluten free bread recipes online for both hand making and bread machines. Try some of the pre packaged boxed mixes for [easyazon_link keywords=”gluten free bread mix” locale=”US” tag=”mmxaz-20″]gluten free bread[/easyazon_link]too, you will also find many options for [easyazon_link keywords=”gluten free muffin...

What is Gluten Free?

What is Gluten Free? This is a term given to foods that do not contain the culprits that contain gluten and there are many [easyazon_link keywords=”gluten free bread mix” locale=”US” tag=”mmxaz-20″]subsitutes for bread, pasta, cookies and muffins[/easyazon_link] to name but a few of the vast array of alternative foods around. Instead of using these grains; gluten free foods are made with potato starch, tapioca starch, rice flour and corn starch amongst others.  However these highly refined starches should be limited especially for people suffering from diabeties, arthritis, heart disease and cancer to name but a few conditions. In most mainstream supermarkets you will find a gluten free section that will give you options to many of your favourite grain laden foods.  This will give you instant alternatives to your current diet.  But if you would prefer to reduce these starchy replacements, then there are some delicious gluten free recipes at Grain Free Foodie that might help you to plan your meals in a tasty way for better health and nutrition. Dr Vikki Petersen in the above video, talks about the difference of something that is wheat free vs. gluten free and how to tell if you have a wheat allergy or gluten problem.  She also goes into the available tests that are used to diagnose exactly which condition you may have. Gluten is a protein found in grains such as wheat, rye and barley and the massive amount of publicity surrounding this substance is due to the fact that it is not tolerated at all by the most extreme sufferers of gluten intolerance – people with celiac (coeliac) disease. The reason this disease is so destructive is that the sufferer’s immune system reacts to gluten with an immune reaction that harms the small intestine, thus making it harder for the person to absorb vital nutrients. Statistics from the University...